February 17, 2016 – Wednesday Meeting Recap

On Sunday and Monday, a few members came in to design the final robot and finish the code for visual acquisition. Parts of the electrical board were mounted onto the final, white wheeled, chassis. The team continues to finalize their robot in preparation for stop build day.

Fabricators took the wheels off the final chassis in order to replace the bearings with new mounts. Metal was bent to form an ‘M’ shape and will be placed on the outside of the wheels. A part for the robot that will be used as a forklift for the wheel shooter was taken to the STEM building to be welded together. This part also needed to be cut in order to fit on the chassis. It will stay on that robot so the drive team can practice using it before competition. The pneumatics mount also was fixed. Two other groups of fabricators worked on completing the portcullis and constructing bumpers.

Forklift
Forklift
Working on Wheel Shooter
Working on Wheel Shooter
Bumpers
Bumpers
Portcullis
Portcullis

The electrical team soldered the new victors for the final robot, wired in prep for the final forklift, and made minor changes to the board, including clearing an area to mount a kangaroo computer. They also worked with coders to wire the LED ring, all the while remaining cautious as to what is competition legal. In order to test the LED they had to solder an older version of a victor, a SPIKE. Towards the end of the meeting, a bad connection had to be fixed on the wheel shooter.

Wiring the Final Robot
Wiring the Final Robot
LED Wiring and Programming
LED Wiring and Programming

Programmers continue to work on autonomous mode. Their plan of action is to have the robot go straight through obstacles and make a goal with minimal turning. A kangaroo computer was mounted on the wheel shooter in order to continue testing visual acquisition. The design team CADed and 3D printed a mount for the camera to help with testing.

The drive team continues to practice feeding the wheel shooter and going through timed trials. They measure how long it takes for drivers to destroy a defense and make a goal. Aiming accuracy is exponentially increasing with each practice run! O-ZONE’s team standard was also finished being designed today, other amazing accomplishments are to come in the future.

Practicing Feeding
Practicing Feeding

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